Cerebral Palsy

The term “cerebral palsy” is not a specific diagnosis, but is now generally applied to children who experience some form of brain trauma either at the time of birth or shortly before. Typically, these children manifest some degree of cognitive impairment as well as physical impairment, often with weakness and spasticity of arms and legs. Typically treatment therapies for children with cerebral palsy have been directed at the physical manifestations of the underlying problem. That is, most efforts are geared to increase range of motion, reduce spasticity, and increase strength, along with specific therapies designed to enhance skills of communication and academic performance.

Evidence from around the globe is now accumulating providing strong support for the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) as an approach to the actual underlying problem in children with cerebral palsy – a technique which actually targets the abnormalities of brain function. The use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in cerebral palsy offers an exciting new therapeutic approach for the treatment of cerebral palsy. In actuality however, hyperbaric oxygen therapy itself is not a new technique. It has been utilized for decades for the treatment of injuries related to underwater diving, and in addition has found great utility in the treatment of poorly healing wounds, burns, various bone disorders, complications of radiation therapy, circulatory problems, carbon monoxide poisoning, multiple sclerosis, head injury, and stroke.

The effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in children with cerebral palsy is likely a manifestation of enhanced function of previously damaged neurons. These neurons have been called “idling neurons” in that while they are still alive, they have been damaged to the extent that their function is compromised.

While it is important to recognize that hyperbaric oxygen therapy clearly represents an important tool in the treatment of children with cerebral palsy, it should be viewed as an adjunctive form of therapy to be used in conjunction with other established treatment protocols including physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, as well as pharmaceutical therapy designed to reduce spasticity. The use of HBO in children with cerebral palsy is becoming more popular in the United States and there is no doubt that because of its profound effectiveness, its utilization will become much more widespread.

Neurological Patient – Benefit of HBOT

THE BENEFITS OF HBOT FOR THE NEUROLOGICAL PATIENT.  A MOTHER DESCRIBES THE IMPROVEMENTS THEY HAVE SEEN IN THEIR DAUGHTER AFTER RECEIVING HYPERBARIC OXYGEN THERAPY.

CHARLOTTE 1

Charlotte 1 of 2 (Video – 1 minute)

 

CHARLOTTE 2

Charlotte 2 of 2 (Video – 1 minute)

Helping Charlotte and many patients in similar circumstances, is why Hyperbaric Healing Institute exists.  As a provider of HBOT, we want well informed patients/families, who have the desire to receive HBOT, to be able to receive this therapy.  Every patient’s needs/issues are unique, but improvements in patients’ conditions are possible and it is the goal of both families and staff.

If there is one factor that we could stress to any individual or family, regarding Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT), is that early intervention is a very important component in recovery.  Intervening early after trauma or diagnosis does improve the opportunity for greater benefit.  To read more about Hyperbaric Healing Institute, HBOT and what is offered at our office, please click on the links below.

Hyperbaric Healing Institute provides state-of-the-art hyperbaric oxygen therapy.  Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) is a medical procedure that involves the patient being placed in a completely enclosed chamber in which the atmosphere is controlled and the patient is able to breathe pure 100 percent oxygen. This level exceeds atmospheric pressure. The hyperbaric process places oxygen in places within the body at a cellular level, and also where the circulation might be blocked. HBOT therapy is not painful and it is not an invasive procedure. HBOT therapy can be used in conjunction with other medical treatments as part of a patient’s treatment plan. Learn More *

Brain Injury, Concussion and HBOT

Brain Image 4:7:16

Symptoms of brain injury include:

  • Becoming fatigued easily
  • Disordered sleep
  • Headache
  • Vertigo or dizziness
  • Irritability or aggression with little or no provocation
  • Anxiety, depression, or affective lability
  • Changes in personality (e.g., social or sexual inappropriateness)
  • Apathy or lack of spontaneity

As the U.S. military struggles to treat thousands of veterans diagnosed with brain injury, and as the NFL and collegiate football programs struggle with a growing fear of concussions (brain injury), Dr. Harch is hopeful that the series of treatments he has developed will come into widespread use.  And he’s getting support from LSU Head Football Coach Les Miles.

Miles says he first heard about Dr. Harch’s studies a couple of years ago, and he’s become so convinced that the treatment works, that he wants a fully-staffed HBOT chamber in a hospital, as close as possible to Tiger Stadium.  It hasn’t happened yet, and Coach Miles says he doesn’t understand the resistance from the Baton Rouge medical community…Read More

Hyperbaric Healing Institute provides state-of-the-art hyperbaric oxygen therapy.  Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) is a medical procedure that involves the patient being placed in a completely enclosed chamber in which the atmosphere is controlled and the patient is able to breathe pure 100 percent oxygen. This level exceeds atmospheric pressure. The hyperbaric process places oxygen in places within the body at a cellular level, and also where the circulation might be blocked. HBOT therapy is not painful and it is not an invasive procedure. HBOT therapy can be used in conjunction with other medical treatments as part of a patient’s Brain Injury treatment plan. Learn More *

Intensive Physical Therapy

PWBTT treadmill

Intensive Physical Therapy – PT for 3 hours a day, 5 days a week, for a several weeks.

The concept of intensive therapy, is to train or retrain the brain and body to work together by teaching high repetitions of movement patterns and exercises in a concentrated period of time.

Intensive therapy for children has been in practice for decades in European countries.  In the past, American families who were interested in this effective and innovative approach, would travel outside the country to allow the opportunity for their child to participate in intensive therapy programs.  Since the late 1990’s, the practice of Intensive Physical Therapy (IPT) has been spreading across the United States.  Clinics may vary in their individual approach, but they share the basic concept of short duration, intense daily therapy.

Conventional physical therapy for most children who require physical therapy for chronic developmental conditions, such as brain injuries, will commonly allow for hour-long therapy sessions, one or two times per week, on an ongoing basis for years.  A child’s progress is measured on an individual basis, based on objective and subjective report of the therapist and family.  Although large-scale research has not been conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of this ongoing model of therapy, it has long been accepted by the therapy community and reimbursed by insurance companies.  Similarly, progress using the intensive model of physical therapy is measured on an individual basis, using common therapy tests and measures, as well as the goals of the family, to determine if acceptable progress is being made.  The benefits of Intensive Physical Therapy that therapists and families observe – are remarkable:  Children can make measurable gains in a fraction of the time by condensing months’ worth of therapy into a few weeks.

For children with neuromuscular disorders, such as cerebral palsy, Intensive Physical Therapy provides the opportunity to practice correct movement patterns repetitively in a controlled environment.  This repetition and consistency is necessary for neurological reeducation, which means the brain is being taught to automatically use the correct pattern of movement.

The intensive method of therapy allows us to target all areas of need in a condensed period of time. This provides faster development of skills and strength. During an Intensive Physical Therapy session, we utilize several unique therapy tools that are not typically offered throughout the majority of the United States. The ‘TheraSuit’ is one of the innovative tools we offer to our patients during the intensive session. The ‘TheraSuit’ is an external orthotic that is worn during physical therapy to work on properly aligning the body, to assist with normalizing the patients’ gait pattern while allowing for neuromuscular re-education to occur. We also use the ‘Universal Exercise System’, that allows functional weight training and gait training in a weight-supported environment.

Children with other developmental delays, such as Down’s Syndrome, can also benefit from the intensive model of therapy.  All children learn by a process of trial and error.  A child attempts a new skill many times, learning many ways that do not work, before achieving success.  A child with developmental delays may require more trials before mastering a new skill.  Intensive therapy allows for many repetitions of functional skills, to facilitate mastery in a shorter amount of time.

If children have muscle weakness that is contributing to their delayed motor development, strengthening may be a necessary component of the therapy plan.  Physical therapists know that muscle does not become stronger if it is challenged on an inconsistent basis.  Just as a person will not get stronger by going to the gym for one hour per week, a child’s muscles will not get stronger with therapy once per week.  Intensive therapy allows the therapist to use strengthening tools and exercises consistently, to improve the child’s flexibility and strength.  With this new strength, new functional skills are possible.  Once the child is utilizing his new strength in a functional way, for instance – in the ability to jump, the functional strength will be maintained.

Intensive Physical Therapy Services 

At HHI (Hyperbaric Healing Institute) each client is treated one-on-one by a licensed physical therapist, at all times.  Therapy sessions are tailored to the individual’s needs and goals, and typically last 2-4 hours daily, Monday through Friday, for three weeks.

For more information on this therapy, please call Hyperbaric Healing Institute at (816) 801-7878.

HBOT Cerebral Palsy Testimonial

HBOT  Cerebral Palsy Testimonial

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy/ HBOT for Cerebral Palsy

Thank you for sharing your journey. As parents of a child with Cerebral Palsy we also have experienced, first hand, the benefits of HBOT for Cerebral Palsy.  Do your research.

Hyperbaric Healing Institute provides state-of-the-art hyperbaric oxygen therapy.  Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) is a medical procedure that involves the patient being placed in a completely enclosed chamber in which the atmosphere is controlled and the patient is able to breathe pure 100 percent oxygen. This level exceeds atmospheric pressure. The hyperbaric process places oxygen in places within the body at a cellular level, and also where the circulation might be blocked. HBOT therapy is not painful and it is not an invasive procedure. HBOT therapy is used in conjunction with other medical treatments as part of a patient’s treatment plan. Learn More

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Near SIDS

 Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Near SIDS

Luke suffered a Near-SIDS incident.  He has made amazing progress during his first course of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for near-SIDS.  After a round of HBOT for his brain injuries, his improvements are significant.  Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

 

HBOT gets more popular! The Wall Street Journal

Use of HBOT as Autism Treatment

WSJ

 

Hyperbaric Healing Institute provides state-of-the-art hyperbaric oxygen therapy.  Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) is a medical procedure that involves the patient being placed in a completely enclosed chamber in which the atmosphere is controlled and the patient is able to breathe pure 100 percent oxygen. This level exceeds atmospheric pressure. The hyperbaric process places oxygen in places within the body at a cellular level, and also where the circulation might be blocked. HBOT therapy is not painful and it is not an invasive procedure. HBOT therapy is used in conjunction with other medical treatments as part of a patient’s treatment plan. Learn More

Hyperbaric Oxygen – Hypotonic Cerebral Palsy

Hyperbaric Oxygen for Hypotonic Cerebral Palsy

Things mom and dad have noticed during Eli’s first series of 40 HBOT treatments

  • Cognition
  • Alertness
  • He is starting to eat food
  • Improvements in his Temperament and Sleep Patterns
  • Stood for 17 seconds by himself
  • Getting a walker because his legs now have reflex to walk

Traumatic Birth – 6 years later

MalakaiMalakai was born 4 weeks early and in grave condition. He had a loss of oxygen during delivery for a significant amount of time. With that being said he was a sick little guy. He spent 26 days in the NICU at Children’s Mercy Hospital. During our stay in the hospital they ran EEG, MRI, Catscan, EMG, X-Rays and a whole kit and caboodle of other tests. These tests showed that Malakai had severe cerebral palsy. He had no brain activity on the front or left side of his brain. His diagnosis was hard to swallow when he was completely healthy before delivery. I was going to do everything in my power to help him live a full life. They said he would never crawl, walk, jump, run, etc. When I brought him home he had a feeding tube, never cried, never opened his eyes or any other ‘normal’ baby things. At 31 days old I took my little baby boy to Hyperbaric Healing Institute to start treatments. Every morning for one month we suited him up for a dive. He was the smallest one that had been treated at the time. I held him while we just put his whole body in the hood. I wish I had taken pictures of him at the time. Within two weeks of the dives we saw huge progress. I was able to wean him off of his feeding tube, he was opening his eyes on a regular basis, he began crying, all of these things were miracles happening right before our eyes! We continued to do the dives until Malakai was two years old and at that point we felt that Malakai had recovered almost 100% from his brain injury. Today, Malakai is an active little boy that runs, jumps,plays, everything that a ‘normal’ six-year-old would do. Don’t get me wrong that these hyperbaric treatments will heal you completely. Every person is different and the sooner after the incident happens that you get to do the treatments this better your chances of recovery are. Malakai also has done a lot of physical therapy, speech therapy, occupational therapy and he still actually is in a couple of those therapies at this time. But, without the hyperbaric oxygen therapy treatments I honestly do not think he would be as successful as he is today.  (Written by Jessica, Malakai’s awesome mom! 9/4/14)